No Kill Advocacy Center
Free to Good (or Bad) Shelter:
A supporter who recently read Redemption, the book by No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd about the No Kill revolution in America, wants to get it in the hands of shelter directors nationwide. She is offering to pay for them to get it free. We’re also throwing in a free CD with over 200 documents, including “how to” guides, sample policies and procedures, and more. If you are a shelter director and want a free copy of the book and CD, please send a letter on official letterhead to:

No Kill Advocacy Center6114 La Salle Ave. #837Oakland CA 94611

The fine print: No emails. U.S. addresses only. Only one per shelter. Under the terms of the grant, this offer does not apply to foster-based rescue groups. While supplies last.

Free to Good (or Bad) Shelter:

A supporter who recently read Redemption, the book by No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd about the No Kill revolution in America, wants to get it in the hands of shelter directors nationwide. She is offering to pay for them to get it free. We’re also throwing in a free CD with over 200 documents, including “how to” guides, sample policies and procedures, and more. If you are a shelter director and want a free copy of the book and CD, please send a letter on official letterhead to:

No Kill Advocacy Center
6114 La Salle Ave. #837
Oakland CA 94611

The fine print: No emails. U.S. addresses only. Only one per shelter. Under the terms of the grant, this offer does not apply to foster-based rescue groups. While supplies last.


The Ohio SPCA reports that they won a legal victory in Hocking County, OH, in a ruling that declares the use of the gas chamber illegal.

In ruling that it violates Ohio law, the Court of Appeals wrote, “the carbon monoxide method of euthanasia as the standard method of destruction of dogs does not immediately and painlessly render the dog initially unconscious and subsequently dead and is not humane.” This ruling could effectively end the use of gas killing in all of Ohio. The Ohio SPCA writes, “Guns have been silenced, engine exhaust stopped, and gas boxes and gas chambers dismantled!” Congratulations. Next step: bury the needles, too. A No Kill Ohio is within reach.
Photo: An animal lover helps destroy the Medina County, OH gas chamber earlier this year. You can, too!

The Ohio SPCA reports that they won a legal victory in Hocking County, OH, in a ruling that declares the use of the gas chamber illegal.

In ruling that it violates Ohio law, the Court of Appeals wrote, “the carbon monoxide method of euthanasia as the standard method of destruction of dogs does not immediately and painlessly render the dog initially unconscious and subsequently dead and is not humane.” This ruling could effectively end the use of gas killing in all of Ohio. The Ohio SPCA writes, “Guns have been silenced, engine exhaust stopped, and gas boxes and gas chambers dismantled!” Congratulations. Next step: bury the needles, too. A No Kill Ohio is within reach.

Photo: An animal lover helps destroy the Medina County, OH gas chamber earlier this year. You can, too!

At their national sheltering conference this year, HSUS’ Vice-President for Companion Animals admits that pet overpopulation is a myth; that there is a huge market for shelter animals that vastly exceeds the number of animals killed for lack of a home (17 million homes vs. 3 million killed); that we can adopt our way out of killing; and we should.

Though the supply-demand imbalance is actually even more pronounced in favor of the animals (they are using old data), nonetheless, HSUS says that it isn’t a question of ‘too many animals, not enough homes,’ but the need for increasing market share. Coming from HSUS, this is a revolutionary change, striking as it does, to the heart of the killing.

Watch the above 1 minute video excerpt where HSUS is finally making public the statistics revealed by the study, done on their behalf five years ago, showing how demand for animals exceeds the numbers killed in shelters (supply).

The whole 1 hour 10 minute video is available by clicking here.

A review of the data is available from the No Kill Advocacy Center by clicking here.

Though No Kill advocates have endured years of ridicule and abuse for exposing the lie of pet overpopulation, one of its primary proponents is finally admitting that, in fact, it simply does not exist. The questions now become:

  • Will HSUS begin to address the true causes of shelter killing?
  • Will it force shelters to change the way they operate so that animals are kept alive long enough to get into those homes?
  • Will they stop promoting and defending the practice of shelters killing animals when there are empty cages?
  • Will they stop working to defeat laws that mandate all the programs and procedures that allow shelters to replace killing with alternatives?
  • Will they stop telling shelters that they are free to keep killing, rather than implement those alternatives to killing?

So far, the answer to all those questions has been “No.”

The next time someone tells you that “no one wants to kill,” tell them about Aransas Pass, TX where the director has decided to stop all adoptions and kill them all instead: http://www.kztv10.com/news/aransas-pass-no-longer-adopting-out-animals/If you want to tell the City what you think, you can do so here: http://wp.aransaspasstx.gov/city-administration/make-a-comment/

The next time someone tells you that “no one wants to kill,” tell them about Aransas Pass, TX where the director has decided to stop all adoptions and kill them all instead: http://www.kztv10.com/news/aransas-pass-no-longer-adopting-out-animals/

If you want to tell the City what you think, you can do so here: http://wp.aransaspasstx.gov/city-administration/make-a-comment/

Shelter killing is the leading cause of death for healthy dogs and cats in the United States. It doesn’t have to be. 
Join us on our No Kill is Love 2014 tour in the following cities this month for a screening of Redemption, a film about the No Kill revolution in America:
Sacramento, CA, July 10
Denver, CO, July 12
New York, NY, July 16
Boston, MA, July 17
Pittsburgh, PA, July 25
Washington, D.C., July 26
Norfolk, VA, July 27
In most cities, the film will be followed by a presentation on how you can help create No Kill in your community by No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd. 
More info: www.nokill.org
Tickets: www.nokillredemption.com/screenings/

Shelter killing is the leading cause of death for healthy dogs and cats in the United States. It doesn’t have to be. 

Join us on our No Kill is Love 2014 tour in the following cities this month for a screening of Redemption, a film about the No Kill revolution in America:

  • Sacramento, CA, July 10
  • Denver, CO, July 12
  • New York, NY, July 16
  • Boston, MA, July 17
  • Pittsburgh, PA, July 25
  • Washington, D.C., July 26
  • Norfolk, VA, July 27

In most cities, the film will be followed by a presentation on how you can help create No Kill in your community by No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd

More info: www.nokill.org

Tickets: www.nokillredemption.com/screenings/

Over 300 people attended the premier of Redemption in Minneapolis and then again in Ft. Lauderdale. Join us in one of the remaining cities*:
Nashville, TN, June 25
Cleveland, OH, June 29
Sacramento, CA, July 10
Denver, CO, July 12
New York, NY, July 16
Boston, MA, July 17
Pittsburgh, PA, July 25
Washington, D.C., July 26
Norfolk, VA, July 27
Austin, TX, August 3
Las Vegas, NV, August 15
Phoenix, AZ, August 16
Atlanta, GA, August 21
Charlotte, NC, August 22
Fayetteville, AR, August 23
Albuquerque, NM, August 30
Troy, MI, September 5
Chicago, IL, September 18
Modesto, CA, September 20
Ithaca, NY, September 27
Buffalo, NY, September 27
Seattle, WA, October 1
Houston, TX, October 7
Los Angeles, CA, October 12
Tallahassee, FL, October 25
For more information and tickets, visit www.nokillredemption.com/screenings/


* Many of the cities will include a post-screening seminar on how you can help build a No Kill community and in other cities, there will also be an after-party. It is all part of the No Kill Advocacy Center’s 2014 “No Kill is Love” tour.

Over 300 people attended the premier of Redemption in Minneapolis and then again in Ft. Lauderdale. Join us in one of the remaining cities*:

  • Nashville, TN, June 25
  • Cleveland, OH, June 29
  • Sacramento, CA, July 10
  • Denver, CO, July 12
  • New York, NY, July 16
  • Boston, MA, July 17
  • Pittsburgh, PA, July 25
  • Washington, D.C., July 26
  • Norfolk, VA, July 27
  • Austin, TX, August 3
  • Las Vegas, NV, August 15
  • Phoenix, AZ, August 16
  • Atlanta, GA, August 21
  • Charlotte, NC, August 22
  • Fayetteville, AR, August 23
  • Albuquerque, NM, August 30
  • Troy, MI, September 5
  • Chicago, IL, September 18
  • Modesto, CA, September 20
  • Ithaca, NY, September 27
  • Buffalo, NY, September 27
  • Seattle, WA, October 1
  • Houston, TX, October 7
  • Los Angeles, CA, October 12
  • Tallahassee, FL, October 25

For more information and tickets, visit www.nokillredemption.com/screenings/

* Many of the cities will include a post-screening seminar on how you can help build a No Kill community and in other cities, there will also be an after-party. It is all part of the No Kill Advocacy Center’s 2014 “No Kill is Love” tour.


From No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd:

33 dogs, including a 10-day old puppy, are recovering in an animal shelter after being rescued from an abandoned apartment. The dogs are globally undersocialized and had untreated medical conditions. If this shelter killed the dogs, as a typical shelter would have, some people would not criticize the shelter. They would claim that the fault lies with the “hoarders.” And, of course, the perpetrators of the neglect and abuse deserve our condemnation. But thankfully these dogs didn’t enter a “typical” shelter. Because the team in Allegany County, MD, knew that once the dogs are in their care, the calculus changes. Once in the shelter, it is up to them whether those dogs live or die. And so they did what caring people do: a team of volunteers, veterinarians, and staff treated them after hours and all the dogs are safe.
In sheltering, we like to fall back on the cliché that killing is a last resort. But while some give lip service to that, it often is a first resort. The thing that is done when the cages get full. The thing that is done even when they aren’t full. Because that is just what we’ve done in shelters for 100 years and collectively, we stopped imagining a different outcome. But in reality, this response is the most inhumane and extreme of all possible responses. If we had never started doing it, the suggestion that we should would be unthinkable. Yet custom has reconciled us to it to the point that many often see it as inevitable. It is not. 
One of the team at the shelter sent me this: “[O]n Friday, we received a call to pickup over 20 dogs from a abandoned house. What we found when we entered the house was beyond anything we have ever seen before. We pulled 29 dogs out of the house on Friday, on Saturday morning 3 more dogs and Sunday afternoon another dog appeared. But after the weekend, I also know that we can do anything, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. This experience made us stronger and bonded us even more. I was amazed from the response of our volunteers and our community, who rose up to help with whatever they were able to do. I will never forget.”
Whoever says “No Kill is impossible” has not met the team at the Allegany County Animal Shelter. A big thank you to the staff and volunteers who made a lifesaving difference for these dogs. Check out photos of the rescue on their page.

Read the story by clicking here.

Photo: A 10-day old puppy rescued by the Allegany County shelter. In this case, “rescue” and “shelter” are used in the true sense of the words.

From No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd:


33 dogs, including a 10-day old puppy, are recovering in an animal shelter after being rescued from an abandoned apartment. The dogs are globally undersocialized and had untreated medical conditions. If this shelter killed the dogs, as a typical shelter would have, some people would not criticize the shelter. They would claim that the fault lies with the “hoarders.” And, of course, the perpetrators of the neglect and abuse deserve our condemnation. But thankfully these dogs didn’t enter a “typical” shelter. Because the team in Allegany County, MD, knew that once the dogs are in their care, the calculus changes. Once in the shelter, it is up to them whether those dogs live or die. And so they did what caring people do: a team of volunteers, veterinarians, and staff treated them after hours and all the dogs are safe.

In sheltering, we like to fall back on the cliché that killing is a last resort. But while some give lip service to that, it often is a first resort. The thing that is done when the cages get full. The thing that is done even when they aren’t full. Because that is just what we’ve done in shelters for 100 years and collectively, we stopped imagining a different outcome. But in reality, this response is the most inhumane and extreme of all possible responses. If we had never started doing it, the suggestion that we should would be unthinkable. Yet custom has reconciled us to it to the point that many often see it as inevitable. It is not. 


One of the team at the shelter sent me this: “[O]n Friday, we received a call to pickup over 20 dogs from a abandoned house. What we found when we entered the house was beyond anything we have ever seen before. We pulled 29 dogs out of the house on Friday, on Saturday morning 3 more dogs and Sunday afternoon another dog appeared. But after the weekend, I also know that we can do anything, there is nothing we cannot accomplish. This experience made us stronger and bonded us even more. I was amazed from the response of our volunteers and our community, who rose up to help with whatever they were able to do. I will never forget.”


Whoever says “No Kill is impossible” has not met the team at the Allegany County Animal Shelter. A big thank you to the staff and volunteers who made a lifesaving difference for these dogs. Check out photos of the rescue on their page.

Read the story by clicking here.


Photo: A 10-day old puppy rescued by the Allegany County shelter. In this case, “rescue” and “shelter” are used in the true sense of the words.

Community cats are giving the City of Buffalo, NY, a shout out!
The City of Buffalo has budgeted $50,000 for the neuter and release of community cats and passed an ordinance promoting TNR. According to the ordinance, ‘animal control officers shall implement this article with the goal of reducing intakes and eliminating the destruction of cats in consultation with community cat welfare experts including the No Kill Advocacy Center.’

Go Buffalo!

No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd will be in Buffalo on September 27 to screen Redemption, a film about the No Kill revolution in America. For more information, including screenings in other cities, visit: www.nokill.org

Community cats are giving the City of Buffalo, NY, a shout out!

The City of Buffalo has budgeted $50,000 for the neuter and release of community cats and passed an ordinance promoting TNR. According to the ordinance, ‘animal control officers shall implement this article with the goal of reducing intakes and eliminating the destruction of cats in consultation with community cat welfare experts including the No Kill Advocacy Center.’

Go Buffalo!

No Kill Advocacy Center director Nathan Winograd will be in Buffalo on September 27 to screen Redemption, a film about the No Kill revolution in America. For more information, including screenings in other cities, visit: www.nokill.org

Thank you to all the shelters and rescue groups who participated in yesterday’s nationwide Just One Day campaign to erase one day’s worth of killing by finding homes for over 10,000 animals.
You can see photos of some of the animals saved during the 2013 event by clicking here. Final figures for 2014 will take a couple of days to put together, but the photo provides a teaser of 25 of them.

Thank you to all the shelters and rescue groups who participated in yesterday’s nationwide Just One Day campaign to erase one day’s worth of killing by finding homes for over 10,000 animals.

You can see photos of some of the animals saved during the 2013 event by clicking here. Final figures for 2014 will take a couple of days to put together, but the photo provides a teaser of 25 of them.

Today is June 11, a day when thousands of shelters across the country, in partnership with rescue groups, have pledged to stop the killing, even if it is for Just One Day. Some of the largest shelters in the nation are participating, including New York City’s Animal Care & Control.
Last year, over 12,000 animals were saved. On June 12, 2013, shelters opened their doors, knowing with pride and satisfaction that they cleared out their shelter the good way and not by killing. And not only did they save precious lives, but they made it easier to continue saving even more, their cages and kennels were now ready and available to animals who need a helping hand. For the public, for shelters which willingly participated, for all those new adopters and most of all, for the animals, June 11, 2013 was a good day, a happy day, an important day, and an unqualified success: perhaps the safest day for animals in shelters in U.S. history. Thousands of animals were adopted, 1,200 shelters and rescue groups came together, adopters welcomed a new family member, the incinerators remained shuttered and the morgues stayed empty. We erased more than one day’s worth of killing in the U.S.
We hope to do even better today.

Today is June 11, a day when thousands of shelters across the country, in partnership with rescue groups, have pledged to stop the killing, even if it is for Just One Day. Some of the largest shelters in the nation are participating, including New York City’s Animal Care & Control.

Last year, over 12,000 animals were saved. On June 12, 2013, shelters opened their doors, knowing with pride and satisfaction that they cleared out their shelter the good way and not by killing. And not only did they save precious lives, but they made it easier to continue saving even more, their cages and kennels were now ready and available to animals who need a helping hand. For the public, for shelters which willingly participated, for all those new adopters and most of all, for the animals, June 11, 2013 was a good day, a happy day, an important day, and an unqualified success: perhaps the safest day for animals in shelters in U.S. history. Thousands of animals were adopted, 1,200 shelters and rescue groups came together, adopters welcomed a new family member, the incinerators remained shuttered and the morgues stayed empty. We erased more than one day’s worth of killing in the U.S.

We hope to do even better today.